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(Forum Home)--->(GunTalk)--->(Dark Bore VS. Bright Bore?)
Thread Admin: herzogmt (0-0-0) (Last 10 Posts) Posted: 04/25/2006 at 14:53:02
Total Posts: 11
Thread Title: "Dark Bore VS. Bright Bore?"
(no avatar) A quick qusetion....I've read many descriptions on rifles that mention the bore. Some say that it has a dark bore, strong rifling; some say it has a bright bore, strong rifling. I've recently started collecting older firearms and have not quite figured out the meaning on my own. Not to sound dumb but can anyone tell me the difference between a dark bore and a bright bore and is one better than the other. Thanks a bunch..
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Former Seller: OLD RATTLER(103-0-0) Post#1 - Posted: 04/25/2006 at 17:59:17
(no avatar) herzogmt; Welcome to Auction Arms .

I too have noticed these references and I can only speculate what people are talking about , but I have run across bores that had good rifling , but yet just would not clean up to a bright shine on the inside .

The ones I have saw were back during the days that black powder may have been shot in them . I never saw a difference in how they shot as long as you don't have any severe pitting in the bore .

Former Seller: DOC GORDON(36-2-0) Post#2 - Posted: 04/25/2006 at 20:00:32
(no avatar) In my experience as an antique winchester collector for the last twenty odd years I have found that the shootability of a bore is not an issue of color but pitting just as nynn444 says. The cause of a dark bore may vary a great deal. If old enough black powder may be to blame as may corrosive primers but usually I have found surface rust with out pitting and leading are usually the culprits. I've tried lots of tricks over the years on many rifles and carbines and have found that JB bore compound works best especially if the bore is good and hot first 120 degrees or hotter. Plan on getting several layers of crude and metal out if the bore is really shallow appearing. Most old rifles actually have decent bores underneath all those years of shooting without cleaning and nothing I have found works like elbow grease and lots of time.

Former Seller: Kan Do Arms(68-0-0) Post#3 - Posted: 04/25/2006 at 20:47:38
(no avatar) I WOULD MAKE A GUESS THAT THE SUFFER IN BLACK POWDER, THE OLD TIMERS HOME MADE, MIGHT BE THE PROBLEM ON OLDER GUNS. ALTHOUGH I HAD A MODEL 11 REMINGTON THE BARREL WAS DARK AND WOULD NOT COME BRIGHT. DON'T KNOW WHAT CAUSED THAT, WIFE MIGHT HAVE GOT MAD AT ME AND POURED PUREX DOWN THE BARREL. JUST KIDDING. BUT SHE DID CLEAN MY WINDSHIELD ON MY 1990 AIROSTAR FORD VAN WITH PUREX AND RUINED IT. KINDA MADE ME MAD.

Former Seller: Gun nut Bob(61-0-0) Post#4 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 06:23:41
(no avatar) The difference between a bright and shiny bore and a dark bore is that the inside of the barrel has been colored in some manner and the surface is not mirror smooth. Even when the blueing solution is permitted to color the bore, if the finish of the metal is mirror smooth the bore will look bright and shiny. The British insisted on using nitro glycerine in their cordite and the heat from that powder burning, rapidly blackened the bore of their rifles. If a barrel gets a light coating of rust, it will often leave the bore with millions of very tiny pits, that darken the bore. To tell the story on any bore you take a magnifying glass and put to the muzzle with a moderate amount light at the other end of the barrel. Then adjust the focal length by moving the glass closer and further away from the muzzle. In this way you can magnify the surface of the metal at the focal length of the magnifying glass showing all pitting and tool marks that are normally invisible to the naked eye. From what you can tell about the 4 to 6 inches of barrel you can magnify, you can judge the part of the barrel you can't magnify if it looks very much the same to the naked eye. If you are selling a gun with a really bad bore, get an extremely bright light to shine in the bore. The light will blind the looker to where they can't tell a shotgun from a rifle. As to shooting, all other things being the same, even pitted bores sometimes shoot well. Then one barrel I examined on a rifle I was thinking of buying. The bore look like it was almost as good as horrible. When I got the gun home and give it some WR 40 to see just how bad the barrel was. Seems the dark spots were dried up oil and the bore turned out to be pristine. The gun had been sold several times very quickly and cheaply because of that horrible looking bore. Also, some bad looking bores can be improved greatly by polishing them with steel wool and oil. You do this by wrapping steel wool around a brass brush smaller then the bore. Then you can polish the main part of the bore while staying away from the muzzle and throating. But the magnifying glass test will still tell the story!!!!!!!!

Former Seller: CIMARRON(48-0-0) Post#5 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 09:22:09
(no avatar) We had a guy at out local gun shows that would put black KIWI shoe pollish on a brush and run that through the bore followed with one or two not very tight patches. The bores that were a little dark would brighten up some. He would also cold blue any worn spots in the blueing.It didn't take long till everyone that would look at his stuff would smell it real good first. He was so offended by that that he stopped renting tables or selling at the shows. He runs a pawn shop here in town. I think I have seen his stuff on Guns america latly. Very high priced and he is making about 75% on the ones he sells plus the interest he got before the owner forfeited the loan. I saw him one day buy a 7 mag ruger mod 77 with a 3-9 redfield scope on it from an old widow woman for $65.00. You know he is going to sell it for $475.00 to $550.00.

Former Seller: OLD RATTLER(103-0-0) Post#6 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 09:49:08
(no avatar) Cimarron ; They are folks like that . I don't have much use for a feller like that .

Former Seller: Kan Do Arms(68-0-0) Post#7 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 13:09:48
(no avatar) OH YEAH WELCOME TO THE SIGHT HERZEGMT. YEAH, CIMARRON, HE MIGHT BE LIKE THIS FELLOW IN MISSISSIPPI, THAT OWNED A BAR AND RESTRAUNT. MADE A DEAL WITH A LOCAL BUTCHER TO BUY ALL HIS STEAKS AT $1.00 EACH SIGHT UNSEEN. SOLD THEM IN HIS RESTRUANT FOR $15.00 EACH. HE SAID HE WAS HAPPY WITH THE 14% PROFFIT. KELLY

Former Seller: eastbank(17-0-0) Post#8 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 15:16:38
(no avatar) here in the east we have a name for that kind of person. a biochemist, when you have it, it,s shxt. as soon as he gets it, he turns it into gold.

Former Seller: CIMARRON(48-0-0) Post#9 - Posted: 04/26/2006 at 16:12:19
(no avatar) Hay, I like that and will have to remember the term BIOCHEMIST. I would bet there are some everywhere. Getting back to the dark and shinny bores. I try to stay away from the dark ones cause to me it is dark from being rusty at one time or another.My son bought a mod 1891 mouser at a gun show one time about 25yrs ago and it was very dark. The rest of the gun looked very good. He bought some Norma ammo and a set of RCBS dies. With a little sight black on the front sight and with his 20year old eyes it would shoot an inch or inch and a quarter at a hundred yds. I shot it and I could get it to do about 1 1/2 to 2 inches. I liked it much better than when I first saw it. The next time I got a chance to buy one like it, I did. Mine was totally unissued and mint in every way. Well I tryed every load I could and tryed .310 and .311 bullets, recrowned the muzzle and the best I ever got was about a 6 inch group. It had the shinniest best looking bore you ever looked through. He still has his and I took mine for a one way ride, traded it for a real nice k22.

Former Seller: eastbank(17-0-0) Post#10 - Posted: 04/27/2006 at 02:48:40
(no avatar) all tidbits are free to use,at no charge. only the names were changed to protect the once unenlightened. me !

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